3 Steps to Set up eCommerce Tracking in Google Analytics

Ecommerce- Tracking

photo credit: technource

To all the eCommerce store owners, if you haven’t set up eCommerce tracking in Google Analytics then you are not taking your online business seriously. I think that you all have heard the word “eCommerce Tracking” but don’t have an exact idea what it is and how it is beneficial for business. In short, it is a feature offered by Google analytics that allows admins to track transactions on a web store. Due to this feature, one can establish the right strategy to increase ROI. It generates tracking information like from where a customer purchase product, time, how much customers spend on purchases, etc.

Why e-Commerce Tracking should be Enabled in Google Analytics for your Online Store

As mentioned above, it allows you to track online transactions, but what kind of data? These all are the reasons why eCommerce store should have set up eCommerce tracking:

  • Total revenue of online store
  • Each product revenue
  • Number of specific product sold
  • Total transaction
  • Total number of products sold in a particular date range
  • No of unique purchase made
  • Date-wise revenue generation
  • Time of transaction occurs

From these data types, one can easily find out which product is being sold well and which one isn’t. Through this tracking, we get valuable insight of our eCommerce store at just one click & use it in marketing efforts to gain maximum return on Investment (ROI) with less effort. By having exact information about revenue generation from the store, we can justify it and put it in line with our desired expectation. For example, if you are not getting good results from particular products then you can set discounts and offers on it to get ROI from it.

For any eCommerce business, it is necessary that visitors come again & purchase new products from your store. E-Commerce Tracking helps in Re-marketing strategies to target specific audience and enhance conversions because this feature gives data about returning customers and their transactions.

We have discussed what is it and why it is beneficial, but the main question is how do we implement in Google analytics?

Steps to Implement E-Commerce Tracking in Google Analytics:

Step 1. Create a Google Analytics Account: This is simple to create with your Google account. If you have already one then let’s move ahead.

Google-Analytics-Admin

Step 2. Go to the Desired profile account. Sign into your account, choose the desired profile account and go the “Admin” Section which is shown in the top right side. 

Google-Analytics-ecommerce-tracking

In the third column on the right side, you can see the “Ecommerce tab”, click on it and set it to “YES”. Now you are allowed to see the information about transactions.

ecommerce-tracking-Google-Analytics

Step 3: See it on your Reporting: Click on Reporting tab on the top of page. In the left sidebar, you will see the tab “conversion → eCommerce” and you are in the area of E-Commerce Tracking. This is where you can analyze the data of product purchase, sales performance, transactions, time to purchase, etc that helps a business owner make better decisions for the next business strategy and steer online business the right way.

Ecommerce-Overview-Google-Analytics

Remember this:

Before going ahead, it is important to add the eCommerce command between the analytics code. This is must to load the eCommerce plugin into your website. Otherwise your eCommerce tracking won’t work. Here is your e-commerce command:

Syntax: ga(‘require’, ‘ecommerce’, ‘ecommerce.js’);

Put it below this code: ga(‘create’ , ‘UA-your id’, ‘auto’), otherwise you will not able to see tracking. See the below image to put this command properly in analytics code:

ecommerce-command

Over to You:

Most online store owners are aware of Google analytics and use it for search analytics, real time traffic, and user behavior but not about E-Commerce Tracking. After reading this post, you should be aware about this and your next step will be to set up E-Commerce Tracking in your online store. If need help, contact an eCommerce SEO Agency, and they can do it in no time. If you are a Google analytics nerd and wish to add more about this topic, we welcome you to add your ideas in the comments.

 

chiranjivChiranjiv Joshi is working in Technource and has contributed this post on behalf of Technource –  Professional SEO services provider to help eCommerce Owners. He is passionate about writing post of eCommerce marketing. He spends most of his time in researching & implementing the new organic tactics related to Internet marketing.

How to Strike the Right Content Balance for Maximum Reach

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photo credit: Shutterstock

Every marketer knows the name HubSpot. Thanks to its blog posts, webinars, e-books, video content, and social media, HubSpot has established itself as a go-to resource in the industry. The company’s success serves as a case study in how to leverage content to grow a company.

Audiences today have unprecedented control over what they consume. They can customize their media experiences, and they have little tolerance for irrelevant content. Marketers must not only be creative in what they present to audiences, but also in how they deliver it.

HubSpot accommodates all of its readers by producing high-quality content across several platforms. At DivvyHQ, we also market to marketers, so we know the importance of diversity. An interesting mix of information and delivery methods attracts new customers, retains current clients, and educates your community.

Striking the right content balance comes down to knowing your audience. Any two customers might have radically different interests and ways of interacting with your brand. Once you know the individuals in your community, you can create a content strategy that resonates with each of them.

Great Strategies Begin With Infrastructure

Content isn’t worth much until you understand your audience. Before you put pen to paper (or fingers to keyboard), develop buyer personas based on your market research. These customer profiles should dictate every aspect of your strategy.

Don’t write a single line of content until you’ve built the right infrastructure. Let the following principles guide your content planning:

  • Sustainability: Before starting a company blog, video series, and monthly webinars all at once, ask whether you have the manpower to follow through on all three. If you’re a small company with a one-person marketing shop, you may want to stick to weekly blog posts or a quarterly webinar for now. Sustainable quality trumps one-off quantity.
  • Frequency: Establish a publishing schedule, and stick to it. Put out valuable content on a consistent basis so your audience comes to rely on your insights.
  • Experimentation: Small teams often have ideas for five marketing channels and the resources for one. Start with the strategy most likely to resonate, and test others as your capabilities grow. By incorporating new tactics slowly, you maximize your results while maintaining quality and frequency.  

Variety Is the Spice of Content

Once you set a publishing schedule, build variety into your publishing platforms and the content itself. Here are the three key areas in which you want to diversify your approach:

 

  • Your Mission: Each content channel may serve a different purpose. Maybe you’re using email to promote a product, a blog post to educate, and a tweet to entertain. Whatever the end goal, the content and tone should reflect each channel’s mission.

 

  • The Format: Know whether your audience favors long-form articles or videos — or both. Let your research guide the types of content you produce to ensure you’re reaching your entire community with the format they’ll love.

 

  • The Channel: Identify which delivery vehicles stand the best chance of reaching your audience. Do your top prospects frequent Twitter or Pinterest? Are they more likely to act on an email or a video ad?  Marketers have access to countless media platforms, so experiment with a mix of channels, and document which ones best engage your target market.

People expect brands to create content that speaks to them on the platforms they prefer. You strike the right balance by knowing your audience and learning how best to communicate with them. The more adaptable you are as a marketer, the more likely you are to connect meaningfully with audiences on behalf of your company.

 

Brody-DorlandBrody Dorland is the co-founder of DivvyHQ, the ultimate content planning and production workflow tool for high-volume teams.

A Guide to Generating More Leads with Incentives

It was meant to be so easy, huh?

You heard about the importance of building an email list. How it helps build an audience. Nurture leads. And develop relationships with them too.

And they said it’s so simple. Just put up a form on a site and watch signups rolling in.

Yeah, right…

It’s just that a month later you still haven’t had even a single subscriber.

You see, lead generation isn’t that simple. For one, most visitors need an incentive that will compel them to sign up.

In this post, I’ll show you exactly how to use incentives to generate more leads.

But first…

Why Incentives?

The easiest way to define an incentive is as something that motivates a person to take action. Study after study has proven that we respond predictably to positive or negative incentives.

But why do incentives work? It’s quite simple – they make taking the decision to perform a certain action easier.

When it comes to online marketing, an incentive is typically some attractive element like a bonus, offer or promise designed to stimulate a desired action.

And it works.

Marketing Week, for instance, reports that 40% of web visitors are willing to sign up to a mailing list in return for something of value.

But what incentives should you offer?

Typically, incentives (otherwise known as lead magnets) can come in a variety of forms, including:

eBooks

I know what you’re thinking – who has time to write an eBook?! But your blog is bursting full of articles that can be combined and repurposed into an attractive eBook.

Checklists

A checklist is a brilliant opportunity to turn your content into actionable advice. Combine a how-to article with between 5 and 10 steps for putting your suggestions into practice.

Content Upgrades

A content upgrade is one of the quickest incentives to create since they should enhance a piece of content that already exists. So if you have a blog post that you had to edit down because it was too long then offer the full, unabridged version at the end of the article. Your readers will already be primed for this type of content so they are more likely to opt-in to read more detail.  Some marketers have been able to increase opt-in rates by 785% with a simple content upgrade.

Email courses

Most marketers underestimate the amount of knowledge that they have amassed over their careers. Email courses are a great way to showcase your knowledge about your industry to people who be new to your space. Because a course occurs over a longer period of time you don’t have to write all your content at the start – just plan the general topic and write as you go.

Why do these work?

The examples listed above could all be considered educational incentives. They generally work because:

  1. They offer knowledge the person lacks.
  2. Promise to solve a particular problem.
  3. Are easy to consume almost right away, providing an instant gratification after signing up.

How should you present these incentives?

Once you’ve selected the type of incentive that suits your content best, it’s time to serve it to visitors and convert at least some of them into subscribers.

To successfully generate leads with incentives you’d need a data capture form to get a visitor’s contact details. There’s a number of ways you can do this, including:

Displaying a static ad in the sidebar

This is the most common way to offer an incentive and because of this, many people have become blind to this method.

 

IncentiveUsing a scrolling ad

The problem with a static ad is that once the reader scrolls down the page, it disappears from their sight. To overcome it, you could use a scrolling ad, one that moves as readers goes deeper into the content.

Incentive

Display a HelloBar

HelloBar allows you to place a colored bar across the top of the browser’s window to communicate whatever incentive you offer.

Incentive

Using a Pop-Up

This is another highly common method. Use a pop-up that will display after a visitor has spent a certain amount of time on a page or performed a specific action.

Incentive

Banner Under the Post

Finally, many sites also display banners under the post – this is the perfect position for a content upgrade. Some of these include signup form right away, others link to the landing page.

Incentive

Conclusion

If you offer your readers something of value before asking for anything in return you’ll be doing more than a good deed – you’ll watch your opt-in rates rise and your lead generation accelerate.

What sort of incentives have you had the best results with? Tell us in the comments so we can add them to our list.

 

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Kevin McGrath is a co-founder at Beacon, an online tool that helps small business owners to quickly create content incentives like eBooks, checklists and upgrades without hiring a designer. When not working, you’ll find Kevin either playing or watching football.

What Makes a Good Marketing Strategy?

Let’s begin with an answer to the question “What is marketing strategy?’. This popular expression tends to be mistaken with promotion or advertising strategy. Marketing strategy shows how you’re going to use your 4 Ps – product, promotion, price and place, to improve your business results. Your marketing strategy should answer these 4 questions: what you are going to sell, how you are going to price it, where potential customers will be able to find your products and how you are going to promote it. On the top of that, it should contain goals you want to achieve so that you’re able to see how effective your strategy is.

So how to build a good marketing strategy? I’ll walk you through all 4 elements of marketing mix, show you best practices and give a few tips. Following these guidelines will help you create a strong and effective marketing strategy with little effort.

4 Ps

1. Product

The first step is to define your product (or services). What do you sell? If you’ve been around for some time, look at the structure of your revenue. What do people buy the most frequently? Pareto rule probably works well and 20% of products secure 80% of revenue. Identifying them will help you promote them better.

Also, you can consider adding new products. Doing it blindly can be dangerous, this is why you can ask your visitors or customer what they would like you to offer.

Tip: take a look at this case study to learn how RaveNectar used surveys to find out what visitors want him to sell.

2. Price

Now you know what you’re selling. How to set prices to maximize your profit? Some would say ‘Rise prices – you will grow your margins!’, some would say ‘Cut prices – you will attract more customers!’. I won’t tell you which solution is the best for you. What you should do to find it out is to test. You can raise or cut prices of some products by a few percent and observe what happens.

It’s more difficult when you’re about to start a new business – you don’t have data to compare. What you can do is to analyze pricing strategies of your competitors and conduct a small market research.

Tip: if you want to know more about setting prices, take a look at this guide based on experience with pricing experiments. 

3. Place

How are you going to reach buyers? It’s a tough question even for brick and mortar stores – there are hundreds of ways you can arrange products on shelves, you can even consider going online. You can also sell your products in your own store or offer it to resellers. There are many options you to consider.

If you already sell products in your online store, you can consider selling products on platforms like eBay or Amazon to reach even more customers.

4.Promotion

Products rarely sell themselves and promotion is a key to a successful business. You can offer great products for low prices in a fantastic store but you will quickly go broke if you have 0 customers. This can be the most complicated issue due to a number of possible options. You can advertise your business on social media, run AdWords or display campaigns, try marketing or content marketing, retargeting and a number of other online marketing techniques. On the top of that, there are all the techniques of offline and local marketing you can consider.

Tip: you can look for inspiration here

To make your marketing strategy strong, you should focus on all points because only then they will fulfill each other. Example: cutting prices won’t bring satisfying results if you don’t promote discounts. On the other hand, raising prices won’t help neither if you don’t upgrade your store or a website to make it look more high-end or offer additional services.

Don’t forget about setting goals

Before you implement your marketing strategy, think about metrics you will use to track progress. It can be profit, revenue, a number of sold items or any other metric that will clearly show your progress. The next step is to prepare a detailed action plan. What and when are you going to do and what are the expected results? To make planning easier, you can use a technique of setting SMART goals. It means they should be Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-bounding. More on this topic and a free template

After implementing your marketing strategy, keep track of your progress. Did you want to double your revenue in 12 months but after 6 months there’s only 10% increase? Then you should go back to sketching board. Check which actions brought expected results and which didn’t work. Then think why it happened and how you can improve your performance. Implementing results of such analysis can lead you to significant gains and thus make goals more likely to be achieved.

 

Lucjan Kierczak headshot 150x150Lucjan Kierczak is an inbound marketer at Survicate– an app that makes collecting feedback from customers easy and quick. Collected answers will show you what your visitors expect from you, what problems they face or what’s preventing them from buying. You can find Lucjan on Twitter or LinkedIn.