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Copywriting Tips and Tricks in a Digital World

Thursday is guest post day here at Duct Tape Marketing and today’s guest is Christopher McMurphy – Enjoy!

images-2As a marketing tactic, copywriting has been around since the days when the Mad Men of advertising were knocking back highballs in the afternoon. But times they do change, and the ad world has evolved dramatically since its heyday when television was the dominant technology. These days, the Internet reigns supreme. While we are living in a digital world where social media dominates, the core principals of creating good copy remain the same: attract the attention of the reader, arouse interest in the product or service, and convert that reader into a customer.

Of course, how best to accomplish this is tied directly to the World Wide Web and its shifts in landscape and changing trends. Those marketers who do wish to create compelling, effective copy that reaches the masses would do well to keep some modern tips and tricks in mind. Here are just a few. 

Relate to the reader

We may live in an ever more connected world, but people still yearn for that human interaction. Copywriters can create a direct line to their readership by producing not just quality copy, but personal and emotionally compelling content as well. Data show that copy with just such a personal touch – focusing on a company’s employees, for example – helps to develop a level of trust with the reader. Testimonials can be a useful weapon in the arsenal of the modern copywriter as well. All testimonials should tell a relevant, positive story and be 4-6 sentences in length.

Go visual

At least to a point. Images and advertising have always gone hand in hand, but most copywriters have always felt their job responsibilities began and ended with the written word. Not anymore. It’s no secret that social networking sites such as Pinterest, Slideshare and Tumblr are exploding in popularity, and it’s due to the public demand for images. Even YouTube came into its own as a full-fledged social networking clip site in 2013. For the foreseeable future, how “share-able” a piece of content is will in part be decided by how many images it contains. The key for the modern copywriter is to provide accompanying images that complement the content.

Vital stat: landing pages that include videos see an 86% increase in conversions (Social Media Today).

Be useful

This is the lynchpin on which all successful modern copy hangs. The hard sell is dead as far as modern copy is concerned, and readers aren’t likely to respond to content that isn’t of use to them. That means no sharing and no conversion. The way copywriters can be successful in grabbing the reader’s attention in today’s landscape is by being helpful. An appliance manufacturer, for example, will get much more mileage out of a how-to tutorial on a home improvement site than they will with an email blast campaign touting the merits of their product.

By adhering to the principals listed above, advertisers will stand the best chance of reaching that 61% of global Internet users who search for products online (Hubspot). Moreover, staying abreast of social patterns and the evolution of popular networking sites is not only a winning strategy for today’s copywriters, but a necessary one as well.

photo (83)Christopher McMurphy is a blogger operating in the sphere of tech and marketing. When he’s not pontificating, he’s offering blog writing services to eager clients.

The Missing Ingredient From Your Content Marketing Strategy

Thursday is guest post day here at Duct Tape Marketing and today’s guest is Mark Middo – Enjoy!

content-marketing

photo credit: Craig Garner

“I’m writing blog posts almost on a daily basis, but I am getting zero traction from social media and my conversions are terrible,” said Adrian, the director of a large software company in Australia. “Looking at Google Analytics, it seems like people just get the information and go. No one is sharing – and worse yet, no one is converting. This content marketing thing just seems like a huge waste of time.”

When I got back to my computer a few hours later, I started reading through the content they had been posting on their website. I wanted an early night that night, but I didn’t think I would hitting the pillow that early. These blog posts nearly put me into a coma – they were that boring.

Here’s the problem: practical information isn’t typically the sort of content that can easily go viral (especially if you don’t have a large pre-existing social network). For content to even drive conversions, it needs to be interesting, have heaps of value and be truly unique for it to get even a few shares or influence people to connect further with the business. This is especially true if you are creating content with the goal of generating B2B leads.

One of the main reasons that most business content has minimal sharing potential is that it doesn’t create an emotional reaction for most people. You just read the information, then you take off and find another blog post to read. Content really only gets shared when people go ‘wow’ that was a really awesome article – I need to tell my friends about it.

So what was Adrian missing from his content marketing strategy? What was the vital missing ingredient?

Personality

Adrian’s website was delivering plenty of value; the content was high quality and it was getting traffic, but it was obviously boring people to death. There was no personality to engage readers or make them care about who was writing the content; it was just another faceless company blog, so the visitors took the information they needed and bounced. Nobody wanted to share it because it wouldn’t make them look cool if they did.

The posts were attributed to the company blog rather than to individual authors, and the language was just bone dry – even the most seasoned readers found it tough to get through.

I can imagine people reading it and thinking, “That’s nice, pretty dry but I got some good information,” and then skipping away into the abyss of the Internet – probably to go look at cat memes and never to return.

Seth Godin alludes to this fact in his book, The Icarus Deception, when he notes that connection is the key in this connected economy. And I believe a great way to create connection online is through personality.

So, what are some ways that you can add some personality to your content marketing strategy?

1. The author is the key

Make the blog post from a person, not a company. Bring the author to life. Create a profile for the author, write a good bio that gives the author a personality, use a good, friendly photo (not in a suit with a serious face on) and make sure people can connect with them on social media.

What makes them tick? Is there something quirky about them that you could share?

People emotionally connect with people who have a ‘real life,’ so don’t be scared to provide some information that isn’t just “Adrian is a stiff director from XYZ Company with 30 years of experience blah blah.”

“Adrian loves bungy jumping off 50 story buildings in his wife’s favourite bikini.”

(Maybe that’s not so real, but you get what I mean.)

2. Ease of reading is a must

Write the blog post in a conversational manner. Make it easy to read and don’t use technical jargon. You want people to be able to breeze through the post making it easy for the brain to absorb.

If they get through the blog, quick endorphins will be released in their brains and they’ll feel good about themselves because they have accomplished something.

3. Include personality in your writing

Don’t be scared to add some jokes and create some stories. Occasionally, I’ll even put words that people don’t expect to see in my writing.

Why would I do that? Well, did you know that William Shakespeare would use words in his writing that weren’t actually part of the English language at the time? An example is his use of the word “ungodded” in one of his writings. One theory suggests that he did this to get his readers attention – throw them off a bit.

When we read, our brains actually make predictions about which words are coming next. By using unexpected words or writing something the reader doesn’t expect to read it actually causes us to think, it unconsciously makes the content stick out in our minds because it increases brain activity.

If one of the greatest writers in history used this strategy successfully, there must be some merit to it. So why not give it a go? Just don’t overdo it, or you’ll negate efforts to achieve #2 – ease of reading.

4. Promote sharing and discussion

At the end of the blog post, content marketers will often include an offer, call to action or opt-in. And yes, you should use these tactics to enhance your conversions, but before that, you could weave something into your writing along the lines of: “Hey, if you liked this post, I would LOVE it if you let your friends know about it. If you agree or disagree with what I am saying, give me a yell in the comments box below.”

These are just a couple of little strategies that I like to employ to give my content marketing strategy a bit more personality. Hopefully, you can implement them and start seeing more sharing of your content, too.

And hey, if you liked this article and have some buddies who would benefit from it, I would love it if you could share it with them. If you have any other hot tips that make mine look like Willie Nelson at a Justin Bieber concert, let me know in the comments box below.

middo-150-150Mark Middo is the author of 5 Minute Business and founder of Social Empire, a brand dedicated to helping people brings ideas to life online. After fueling the growth of some of the worlds largest brands including Formula 1, Mizuno, Renault and McDonalds, Mark launched his own start up called Reminisce, an online voting system built for nightclubs. Amazed by it’s instant success, Mark formed Social Empire so he could help people do exactly what he did – turn an idea for a passion project into a lifestyle business in quick time, and for minimal cost.

5 Ways Your Offline Marketing Efforts Can Improve Your Online Reputation

Thursday is guest post day here at Duct Tape Marketing and today’s guest is Andy Beal – Enjoy!

reputationAn ongoing theme in my new book, Repped: 30 Days to a Better Online Reputation, is that your offline actions greatly influence your online reputation. No matter how hard you work to improve your social media engagement, online reviews, or customer satisfaction, it can all be undone if you don’t follow these five important offline marketing strategies.

#1 – Offer a Congruent Experience

The brand experience you sell online should match up with the one which you offer customers in real life. A flashy web site, engaging Facebook Page, or a content-rich blog will only lead to disillusion and disappointment, if someone visits your business, or meets you in person, only to find that you don’t live up to the hype.

Take away – be congruent in the branding experience you provide your customers. Does your offline marketing campaign sync with your online one?

#2 – Sell the Expectation

On a visit to Seattle, I stayed in a boutique hotel for a couple of nights. Unlike a hotel chain, you never know what experience you’ll receive from independent lodging. The hotel took no chances, and upon reaching my room, I discovered a card that thanked its guests for making the hotel the number one ranked in the area. It also went on to explain, that if I felt the same way, how I could submit my vote.

Bam!

Before I’d even had the chance to make up my own mind, the hotel had used social proof to suggest that I would have nothing but an amazing stay.

Take away – you only get one chance to make a great first impression. Don’t leave that to chance.

#3 – Train Your Employees

Make sure you hire employees that really want the job. Hire those that are passionate about your industry. As part of their training, remind them that they are always representing your brand and its reputation.

I recently shopped at a Mattress Firm store, despite reading some negative online reviews. My sales associate was one of the nicest, honest, and trustworthy salesman I have ever worked with. Not only did he change my opinion of the mattress chain, but I share that experience often—including a chapter in Repped!

Take away – get your employees to buy in to the fact that they are an important part of your brand. If they let down the customer, they risk the future of the company—and in turn, their own job!

#4 – Capture Feedback Early

Most online complaints are the result of a customer being mistreated during their business dealings with you. All it takes is for the manager to be too busy to take a customer’s call, or a staff member too arrogant to apologize for a mistake. The next thing you know, you’re reading about their experience on Yelp—along with millions of others!

Instead put in place a feedback system that ensures a customer never finishes their transaction with you without being asked if they were completely satisfied.

Take away – even an automated email survey could help uncover a festering negative experience that might ignite a reputation attack.

#5 – Improve Your Marketing Messages

All customer feedback can be used to improve your marketing messages. When you see a common trend in positive reviews about you, start highlighting those traits in your TV, Radio, and print ads. Likewise, when you a see a competitor come under attack for a weakness that happens to be your strength, capitalize on the event by adding those strengths to your marketing and PR efforts.

Take away – let your customers—and your competitor’s customers—help you craft your marketing focus and product messaging.

Lastly, remember that your offline reputation is intertwined with your online one. A bricks and mortar business is often reviewed and rated online, while an internet business is still discussed in coffee shops and at water coolers. You can’t afford to ignore either reputation.

andy-bealAndy Beal is the CEO of Trackur and is considered one of the world’s leading authorities in reputation management. His new book, Repped: 30 Days to a Better Online Reputation is available now, and you can also catch his “Reputation Roadkill” keynote at ClickZ Live New York.

Equity Crowdfunding: Your Solution for Small Business Financing?

Thursday is guest post day here at Duct Tape Marketing and today’s guest is Salomon Wancier – Enjoy!

equity-crowdfunding-earlysharesSmall businesses haven’t had it easy since the dawn of the recession in 2008, but thankfully they’ve enjoyed a steady (if slow) recovery.

Recent studies show that 2013 was a solid year for small businesses and 2014 should be even stronger. 89 percent of small businesses increased travel between fall 2013 and the previous year. Small businesses created 102,000 new jobs in November alone. And eight out of 10 small business owners plan to increase their products and offerings in 2014.

But in order to travel, add personnel, and execute on expansion plans in the coming year, many small businesses will need financing… which is where things get tricky. Despite being the strongest drivers of growth in the U.S. economy, small businesses face immense challenges garnering funding from traditional sources like venture capital firms, angel investor groups, or debt financing.

Since small businesses aren’t the only ones struggling for financing – startups, entertainment projects, musicians, and others face similar challenges – the new (and popular) crowdfunding industry has increasingly filled the funding gap.

Not all Crowdfunding is Created Equal

In a crowdfunding campaign, a group of individuals pools resources to support a company, organization, artist, or project. Crowdfunding has become a viable way for many entities to raise money. Over $480 million was pledged to campaigns on Kickstarter (the best-known crowdfunding platform) in 2013.

But unbeknownst to many, there are four different types of crowdfunding taking place on various platforms: Rewards, Donation, Lending, and Equity.

Rewards campaigns exemplify “traditional” crowdfunding on platforms like Kickstarter. In exchange for some reward – a discount, freebie, product pre-order, or other item – individuals contribute money to an organization, project, or company.

Donation campaigns are mostly the same, except there’s no physical reward element – just the reward of giving to a worthy cause. In Lending crowdfunding (or “peer-to-peer lending”), individuals loan money to businesses or people at competitive interest rates.

Then there’s Equity crowdfunding – the next phase of the crowdfunding phenomenon and the type arguably best suited to business financing. In an Equity crowdfunding campaign, individuals aren’t backing a project in exchange for rewards; they’re investing in a business. In exchange for contributions, Equity crowdfunding investors receive ownership interest in the entity raising funds – just as would an angel investor or venture capitalist.

Under current regulations, Equity crowdfunding opportunities are only available to Accredited Investors. When the SEC implements rules for Title III of the JOBS Act, the general public will also be able to invest through equity crowdfunding.

Crowdfunding for Small Business: Marketing and Financing

Several factors make Equity crowdfunding a fit for small business financing. The first is marketing.

A crowdfunding campaign (of any kind) is a unique marketing opportunity. Executing a successful campaign requires business owners to promote their companies to new audiences – increasing overall visibility in the process – and motivate their existing networks to support them. Before launching any online fundraising campaign, be prepared to become your business’ biggest cheerleader.

Additionally, Equity crowdfunding is designed to finance companies and other long-term ventures – unlike Rewards or Donation campaigns, which are often best suited to individual projects. (Kick-starter only posts campaigns for “creative projects.”).

Rewards crowdfunding facilitates a limited arrangement between business and backer. Once a project owner delivers the rewards, the relationship between backer and business ends.

Equity crowdfunding, however, establishes a long-term relationship between the crowdfunded company and its supporters – one in which both parties have vested interests in achieving success. Equity crowdfunding investors are likely to patronize and evangelize the company they invest in, since that will help the business earn them a return on their investment.

Which is not to say that Equity crowdfunding is a sure thing. Like any investments in small businesses and early-stage companies, Equity crowdfunding investments are high-risk. And not all Equity crowdfunding campaigns end in successful financing; some companies are bound to fail.

But though Equity crowdfunding is still evolving, it has the potential to be rewarding for certain small businesses and investors. It’s the next logical phase of crowdfunding, it’s the future of investing and financing, and perhaps it’s even the way your small business will fund a promising 2014.

Earlyshares-SalomonSalomon Wancier is Chief Marketing Officer of EarlyShares, a leading equity crowdfunding platform, and an authorized Duct Tape Marketing Consultant. He can be reached at [email protected].  For more on Equity crowdfunding and investing, visit the EarlyShareholder Blog. Stay tuned for a future Duct Tape blog post from Salomon on ‘Equity Crowdfunding 101.’

5 Forgotten Offline Marketing Tactics

Thursday is guest post day here at Duct Tape Marketing and today’s guest is Jayson DeMers – Enjoy!

With the rise in popularity of online marketing, many proven offline methods are simply forgotten when marketing campaigns are planned. Of course, online marketing is hugely important in today’s Internet-connected world, but offline engagement with customers still has unique and distinct value that shouldn’t be forgotten.

If you want to give your business a real marketing boost this year, start looking outside the box. Here are five forgotten offline marketing tactics that don’t require a big marketing budget.

1. Engage in offline guerrilla marketing

Guerrilla marketing is a generic term for the use of unconventional marketing strategies, and because online marketing channels are so narrowly structured, offline is the best arena to flex your small business’s guerrilla marketing muscle. So, starting now, ignore what you know about marketing channels, and let your inner child out to play.

Offline guerrilla marketing ideas:

  • Leave sticky notes in random places (bars, coffee shops).
  • Use chalk to advertise promotions on a sidewalk.
  • “Accidentally” leave a branded pen at the bank.
  • Donate branded bookmarks to your local library.
  • Use sticky notes to create temporary images on buildings, cars, etc.

2. Drop business cards

This is one offline guerrilla marketing strategy that I want to talk about specifically. It’s more of a necessity than an option. If you run a small business, you must have business cards and dole them out! Don’t just share them when you first meet someone new. Drop them everywhere.

Places to drop business cards:

  • Leave a business card with your tip at a restaurant.
  • See a public bulletin board? Put up a business card.
  • Go to the library and place business cards in books related to your business.
  • When you see a contest fish bowl asking for business cards, drop yours in. Always.

3. Take pictures/videos of everything

Because social media marketing takes place online, many business owners and marketers forget that social campaigns can be boosted by offline efforts. One way to do this is by taking photos of company events and daily activities, and then posting those online. Videos help too. If someone from your company speaks at an event, for example, record it and upload it to YouTube.

Real-life photos from the offline world show the personality of your company and increase online user engagement. Facebook posts with photos, for example, receive 84% more clicks and twice as many Likes than text-only posts, according to Kissmetrics. And some of the most popular social networks (Pinterest, Instagram, Tumblr) are image-based, making photos ever more important for online marketing.

4. Donate gift certificates or products as prizes

By offering your product or service as the prize for a local contest, you can build visibility for your business while showing your commitment to the community.

If your business provides computer repairs, for example, you could donate a gift certificate for a 2-hour repair to a local non-profit organization. The organization may announce your branded prize to a room full of sponsors. Your business could also be listed in various publications, such as the organization’s website, newsletter, or even a press release.

5. Speak at events

Professional events offer a great way to meet new people, share your ideas, and build brand awareness. They’re even more effective if you speak at them. Find a local event related to your industry, come up with an educational topic you can speak on, and volunteer. If you don’t yet have the level of clout required to speak at an event, attending events can be just as helpful.

Remember, you don’t have to adopt all of these offline marketing strategies. Just try one. Write a promotion on a couple sticky notes, and put them in your pocket for the day. Who knows what could happen.

jayson-profile-google-plusJayson DeMers is the founder & CEO of AudienceBloom, a Seattle-based content marketing & social media agency. You can contact him on LinkedIn, Google+, or Twitter.

Five Ways You’re Not Going To Get An Investor For Your Startup

Thursday is guest post day here at Duct Tape Marketing and today’s guest is Weston Bergmann – Enjoy!

Angel InvestorThere are a lot of ways to attract an angel investor to your startup. There are even more ways to turn them off. These are some of them.

1. Not Having Traction

Sophisticated investors invest in companies that are ready to scale. Meaning the founders have proven on some level that people will pay for what they’re selling and they’ve proven they can repeat said process. The investment dollars are meant to extrapolate on this proven traction. If you’re asking for dollars and you have no traction, what you’re really saying is you want investors to gamble on your experiments.

2. Not Knowing Your Cost Of Customer Acquisition

Knowing how much it costs to acquire a customer is debatably the most important variable in an investor’s equation. Here’s a simple example, if you know how much it costs to acquire 100 customers…. than investors can use this equation:

Cost of getting 100 customers = X

Revenue from 100 customers = Y

Amount of money investor is willing to invest = Z

(Y minus X) times Z = total profit

Z divided by X = amount of customers

Now the investor can ask himself or herself if the amount of new customers and their profit is a big enough splash to get them to that next level. That next level could be something like organic growth possibilities, a larger round, an acquisition target, etc. If it’s not big enough you’re either not asking for enough money (red flag) or your cost of customer acquisition is too high (bigger red flag).

3. Having a Weak Team

Every investor says the same thing: bet on the jockey, not the horse. They’re looking for a “wow factor” that stands out from the crowd. Think about it…if you don’t stand out, how can you create something else that does? There are a lot of attributes that defines an entrepreneur’s “wow factor.” You don’t need all of these, but it’d be nice:

-Out-of-this-world storytelling ability

-Remarkable education

-Previously failed startup

-Extremely successful previous startup

-Personal money invested

-Ability to build your own product

-Connected (social media, rolodex, leadership roles)

-Back story that stands out (Olympian, celebrity, star athlete, successful author, etc.)


4. Being Unlikable 

If you’re about to take a bunch of money from someone to go off and change the world you’re solidifying a relationship with that person for the long-run. No one wants to work with someone that’s not fun, isn’t likable, isn’t agreeable, and isn’t at least a little cool. If you’re thinking, “wow, this isn’t me at all,” it’s your responsibility to find someone that is and make them the face of your company. Yes, this is sometimes called politics. Deal with it or fund the company yourself.

5. Not Being Honest

There are two major reasons why you want to be honest. The first is it adds credibility. If you don’t say the answer “I don’t know” at least once in a long Q & A session you’re not going to get funded. Investors are going to ping you with hundreds of questions until you’re blue in the face, and they’re purposely going to ask you at least one question there is no answer to. They’re testing you to see if you have the confidence to tell them you don’t know. Obviously you can’t say, “I don’t know” too much, or that looks bad for a different reason. But once-or-twice adds a lot of credibility to the rest of the questions that you did answer.

The second reason why honesty is important is something called fraudulent inducement. It means that if an investor can prove you lied to them about anything during the pitch and due-diligence stage – they’re entitled to 100% of that money back. Trust me, you will have already spent some of it (if not all of it) by the time they want it back. The best way to not get caught lying to an investor…surprise, surprise…don’t lie at all. Ever.

Wes with BootstrapWeston Bergmann is the founder and lead investor in a business incubator in Kansas City called BetaBlox. He’s acquired part of over 60 startups in the last two years alone. He is a radical practitioner of lean methodologies and an honors graduate from the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University. He’s lived in ten different countries and his dog’s name is Bootstrap.

Why Small Businesses Still Need to Network in the Local Community

Thursday is guest post day here at Duct Tape Marketing and today’s guest is Deborah Sweeney – Enjoy!

Why Small Businesses Still Need to Network in the Local CommunityDespite the rise of social networking and the perceived crumbling of face-to-face interaction it has caused, community is not dead. I have always been very passionate about local small business, but when I talk about real life networking within my community, I often get a few raised eyebrows. After all, I run an internet-based business – it isn’t like we get a lot of walk-in traffic! But establishing roots in your local community, regardless of what type of a business you run, is absolutely vital to your continued success. These relationships can help lead to partnerships and, though the internet has made it easier to market, word of mouth in the flesh is still invaluable to brand recognition.

Local recognition is priceless

A few years ago, American Express sponsored a ‘Small Business Consumer Pulse Survey’ to gauge how the average person felt about local small business. According to that survey, 9 out 10 Americans believe it is important to support local small businesses, and 73% of respondents said that they make a conscious effort to shop at local businesses. If your business is known as a local company, a solid majority of the nearby population is going to try to frequent your storefront as much as possible. However, if you hide behind a computer screen and refuse to connect with anyone within your community, they may very well pass you over. And even if you don’t run the type of business that does a lot of walk-in sales, that local recognition is still invaluable. Whether it is through hosting an open house at your office, offering a scholarship, or even sponsoring a banner ad at a local baseball game, making your name known to your community is a precious marketing asset. People who live in the city you do business in will go out of their way to look you up online if they know you are active in their community.

Small businesses that support each other do better

Are you active in your local chamber of commerce? Well you should be! Studies show that by simply involving yourself with your Chamber of Commerce, you increase customer favorability by 44%, and increase the likelihood of future patronage by 64%. The Chamber of Commerce is also a goldmine of information about local economic trends and policies. Business owners swap ideas, and studies are sponsored to help give chamber members a competitive edge. If you are skipping out on your Chamber of Commerce, you are really missing out on some great opportunities to network and mingle with area leaders.

Trust me, it is inspiring

While I love the fact that both my business and my work as its CEO is bettered by becoming involved in the local community, it really is inspiring to be included in a network of small businesses and entrepreneurs. I often try and give talks at local schools and colleges about becoming an entrepreneur because I want that network to grow. According to the SBA, small businesses have generated 64% of all new private-sector jobs over the past twelve years. Taken by itself, the lone small business may not seem like it impacts much at all. But when we work together to build and foster a network of small businesses, we make our community, and our company, better all around.

Marketing is all about increasing brand recognition and bringing in new customers. And while traditional marketing through television, radio, and the internet definitely works, you are missing out on a real opportunity if you aren’t involved in your local network of businesses. Your company should be recognized as the pillar of the local community that it is, and that only happens when you become involved with your town. So when you’re planning out your marketing strategy, remember to include your local community. Not only will your involvement help you to do more business, it will also help make you a better businessperson.

deborah sweeney headshotDeborah Sweeney is the CEO of MyCorporation.com. MyCorporation is a leader in online legal filing services for entrepreneurs and businesses, providing start-up bundles that include corporation and LLC formation, registered agent, DBA, and trademark & copyright filing services. MyCorporation does all the work, making the business formation and maintenance quick and painless, so business owners can focus on what they do best. Follow her on Google+ and on Twitter @mycorporation.

Why Your Sales Pitch Isn’t Converting

Thursday is guest post day here at Duct Tape Marketing and today’s guest is Jordyn Rickard – Enjoy!

EmolectualWith call after call made to numerous businesses or advertisement after advertisement placed for potential customers and no results, you may be on the verge of a mental and emotional breakdown. It’s time to sit down and ask yourself a serious question… Why isn’t your sales pitch converting?

If you’re stumped and think that you’ve tried everything, it’s time to think again. Chances are, you simply are not making the right type of connection with your target consumer or client. Worse yet, there’s a chance you aren’t making any sort of connection. Without forming a connection that resonates deep within the consumer, your sales pitch and product stand very little chance of going to the places you ultimately want them to be.

Read on below for a solid solution to shaping your sales pitch using three easy strategies your ideal customer won’t get enough of.

A Fine Balance and Identifying The Connection Model

An ideal marketing sales pitch will make a connection that appeals to both an intellectual and emotional side. Falling too far on one side or the other eliminates the need and validation required for prospective customers to convert into customers. This scientific connection is dubbed an “emolectual connection.” Think about your pitch and why clients would emotionally want to be involved. Will it make better lives for their families? Make memories? Fill voids that they consistently face? Then turn your pitch around to its intellectual side. Why does this make sense financially? Why are YOU the best solution versus the other guys?

The Emotional Aspect

Convey your passion in your pitch. Tell your audience what makes you get up in the morning and what makes you thrive from day to day. Once they understand where you are coming from, you can turn the tables and connect with them on an emotional level. Part of being a great salesperson is identifying what makes your client thrive on a day to day basis. Showing clients how your product or service can impact their lives for the better will have them wrapped around your finger. Alternatively, a connection that doesn’t also include an intellectual bond will leave you with a wishy-washy client who may or may not drop in a short period of time. An emotional connection compels a person to stick with you over leaving for the other guy.

The Intellectual Aspect

All business minded individuals and consumers operate from a standpoint of validation. Everything they do has to make sense – from a financial standpoint to a moral standpoint. Take this opportunity to tell them why they need you. Why your product is the end all solution to fill the void. Talk finances and keep the end goal focused on them being happier and in a better place with your product in sight. People don’t want to be sold, but people do want to buy. Give them a reason that makes sense and you’re golden.

Most pitches already possess the intellectual aspect of an emolectual connection. By tying the two together to form an emolectual connection, you’ll find your sales pitch not only converts, but resonates deep within a consumer. Business experts and businesses themselves know that an angry customer is more likely to speak up and tell a friend or leave a review than a satisfied customer. But a passionate customer is just as likely to leave a review and speak up. Go for beyond happy customers, strive for a well-rounded connection and benefit significantly!

Jordyn RickardJordyn Rickard is a young marketing professional with over 5 years of experience in marketing and strategy for small and medium sized businesses. With an education in finance and an extensive freelancing background, she’s had the privilege of developing solutions that work for small businesses. Currently, Rickard proudly works as a Success Coordinator for Synduit, a marketing and consulting firm for small businesses. Reach out to Rickard on Twitter @jordynatsynduit .