How to Use Infographics Effectively

Because of the constant bombardment of information we experience on a daily basis, the average human being now has a shorter attention span than a goldfish! In the digital era, marketers have to change and adapt their strategies in order to get their messages heard amongst the many other competing voices. Because humans are wired to respond more positively to visuals than text, infographics tend to get far more shares than traditional text-based content.

Additionally, infographics allow you to create an emotive story around a seemingly meaningless sea of data, allowing people to swiftly understand the key points without having to do any of the tedious reading. While anyone can pay to commission an infographic, there are certain factors you need to consider if you want your infographic to become a viral success!

Choosing the right topic

It’s important to remember that your infographic should never be a tout for your company; instead you should aim to tackle a contentious issue in your industry or cover a hot topic that you know will encourage sharing. In other words, aim to provide genuine value to people instead of simply promoting yourself. With resources such as Google Trends, Twitter hashtags, and numerous RSS aggregators, you’re sure to be able to find a topic that people will love to see encapsulated in a stunning infographic.

Content creation

When researching the facts for your infographic, always use reputable sources and ensure that they are airtight – particularly if your infographic is about a contentious issue – someone is bound to want to point out the flaws in your argument! You may wish to incorporate some quotes from industry specialists to serve as proof elements for your argument. Also, a few interesting lesser-known facts and quirky anecdotes may help to provide some light entertainment for readers.

When organizing your content, thinking visually is crucial. It’s important to remember that not every fact and statistic will make a good visualization, and conversely, not every great visualization will fit within the narrative of your infographic. In order for the infographic to work, the visuals must support the content and help to drive the narrative home. Never be tempted to sacrifice substance for style! As with any form of content marketing, well-researched, high-quality content is the cornerstone of an effective infographic.


You may wish to design an infographic to match the branding of your company, and this may be a good idea if you are creating the piece for company presentations or other internal purposes. However, you should always avoid “over branding” the piece – in most cases you only need to include your company’s logo and website discretely in the footer.

In the design phase, less is more; if you’re used to creating long-winded text content, you may feel reluctant to omit certain pieces of data, even if they aren’t propelling the narrative forward. However, leaving in extraneous elements will only serve to clutter the infographic and confuse people. Always design from a holistic perspective and be prepared to sacrifice elements that aren’t contributing to the clarity and argument of the infographic.


You may wish to create a specific landing page for your infographic, or you can simply post it as part of a blog post. Either way, you should make sure that the page has complete social media functionality so that people can share with ease. Additionally, it helps to include the HTML embed code directly beneath the infographic so people can post it on their websites with ease – this is particularly useful for bloggers within your niche who may wish to incorporate your infographic into their own unique content.

There are numerous infographic submission sites that will be happy to host your infographic and if you’re lucky you could even have it featured on Mashable. However, to get your infographic to go viral you’re probably going to have to do a lot of hustling. Promoting using social media is highly recommended, but don’t forget to leverage your personal network. If you know someone who has a large following online, persuading them to share your infographic can result in huge amounts of exposure, expanding your audience and bringing you new business!

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Jack Knopfler is the Lead Content Editor at Mammoth Infographics. He has a background in digital marketing and has helped clients in a range industries to improve their presence online.

How To Use Reverse Self-Promotion To Generate Exposure and Traffic

reverse self-promotion

The plethora of online social media outlets sure makes it easy to toot your horn these days.

You’ve seen the tweets (I’ve likely been guilty of doing this at some point) – “Just got off a quick call with Richard Branson, he said he loved my book” or “Feeling humbled to be included on this list of the top 1000 accounting bloggers.”

The thing is, even though there will always be people that are impressed by your self-promotional messages, an even greater number of people will be turned off.

But what’s a person to do – I mean you want to get the word out, right?

One of the most effective ways to promote yourself is to promote others.

I’ve used this tactic consistently and authentically for years. Let me start with authentically. In no way am I suggesting this as a corny, slimy way to gain exposure. This is an intentional practice, done in the spirit of sharing and referring, that just happens to pay dividends.

The idea behind reverse self-promotion is that you point out the success of other, give public testament to a great product or service, or share the promotional efforts of members of your networks as much as you share your own successes and offers.

Write a blog post reviewing a great product and then @ mention the tool provider in your tweet – here’s an example

Pick up on the promotional efforts of members of your network and share them

Thank people whose content you dig or whose webinar you attended

Thanks Andrea Sodergren Vahl for stopping by to drop some Facebook ad knowledge on the Duct Tape Marketing Network today.

Posted by Duct Tape Marketing Consultant

Write an unsolicited testimonial and send it to a company that makes a tool you love – here’s an example

Create content, such as an eBook, and offer it to a blogger or site you love and let them cobrand it (or vice versa) – here’s an example

There are so many reasons that promoting others makes sense.

  • It’s a good thing to do
  • It makes you feel good
  • It activates the law of reciprocity
  • It creates influence and authority
  • It reins in blatant self-promotion
  • It makes sharing easier

While I am advocating this approach as a standing marketing tactic – I can’t state this enough – if your efforts along these lines are insincere and only driven by the hope that you’ll get something the impact will be crippled.

Look for ways to promote others as full 50% of your social network activity and you will find your own exposure and opportunities growing at a rate unmatched by any other practice.

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