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Why Video Marketing is Underrated (and How to Use it to Your Advantage)

Today is guest post day here at Duct Tape Marketing and today’s guest is David Preston – Enjoy!

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photo credit: Andrew* via photopin cc

Words tell the story. Images illustrate it.

But video brings it to life.

Video, an online marketing platform that has seen a sharp rise in use and effectiveness, is an often overlooked means for driving relevant traffic to your site – and generating interest in your campaign. An effective video initiative can also bolster your other marketing strategies.

Galactic Café, developer of the recent narrative-driven game The Stanley Parable, got it right.

Galactic Café sent customized preview builds of The Stanley Parable to well-known YouTube users who participate in Let’s Play videos. These users have a tremendous following that tune in for their first impressions of new games.

The developers engaged these YouTube users directly through dialogue in the game. The result: Plenty of organic, viral interaction about the videos that boosted traffic for these YouTube users’ Let’s Play video as well as sales for Galactic Café.

A recent B2B Benchmark Survey revealed more than 90% of marketing respondents used video on a site, second only to the learn more/contact us option (nearly 100%). Video topped white papers and case studies (84%) and even live demos with company representatives (just less than 80%).

We’ll discuss ways to blend video marketing into your online presence, and how easy it is to measure engagement and see results from it. With the proliferation of mobile devices as our primary means of Internet access, and bandwidth and speeds increasing with fiber-optic Internet, it’s prime time for video.

1.  Crunch the numbers

Video content is easily subject to behavior analytics. Because video content is also tagged with keywords and ranks in Google search, you can use a video-hosting site such as YouTube to track interaction. Online retailers such as Amazon and Dell report an increase of as much as 35% when video is incorporated.

Video product reviews on Amazon nearly always appear at the top of Google’s rankings. 

Takeaway: Video content is also easy to share via social networks, and software developers have prioritized video integration in site creation.

2.  Reach customers on a deeper level

Our draw to video is subliminal, too. The concept of fusiform facial area suggests the brain processes categorical data about a person by facial recognition. Basically, the idea is that a person’s face is a factor in how they understand and process the message that person delivers verbally.

The right face on your video campaign can foster trust. A voice also translates your message in an essential way.

Takeaway: A face, a voice, and most of all, emotion, convey what language alone cannot.

3.  Grab attention

Words and images are static. Page viewers are increasingly scan readers. It takes notable effort to read a 300-word blog post, especially compared to a simple click of a video play button. When visitors hit that button, it gives you the chance to actually talk to your prospect. It’s your window to their home. 

Takeaway: Video is an extension of the personal connection we wrote about above, but with a familiarity of having “met” you through your video.

4.  Let your followers sing your praises

Happy customers are gold. You can harvest recorded testimonials at a tradeshow, and it’s best to get as many as you can – aim for at least three, maybe as many as 12. You can also hire a video crew to hold a one-day shoot. Know what key messages you’re looking for when you edit.

Takeaway: The Q&A approach will put your testimonial subject at ease, and will allow you to direct the conversation toward those key messages you identified.

5.  Go forth and conquer

A marketing video on your site is just the beginning. Start a YouTube channel. Incorporate video on landing pages. Post them to social media and your blog page. They’re easily shared through these channels, and the more a video is shared on quality sites, the better your Google page rank.

Takeaway: You’ll reach exponentially more potential clients with a well-made, well-placed video than with nearly any other means of marketing.

91861_92141_1_David Preston headshot_croppedDavid Preston is a husband, a father of 2, and a freelance writer for a variety of sports, entertainment, and marketing sites. You can reach David via his email.

The Future of Small Business SEO (Hint: It’s About Content)

Thursday is guest post day here at Duct Tape Marketing and today’s guest is Phil Singleton – Enjoy!

2013 was an exciting year for small business Internet marketing.  Search engine optimization transformed from a game of link popularity into what it was supposed to be from the beginning: high quality, relevant content from trusted sources.  Make no mistake; quality links pointing to your website are still really important.  It’s just that content marketing and social network participation are (collectively) more important.

volume-backliningAddressing The Content Gap

There is a great line from a Duct Tape Marketing Blog post from last year: “Content is King…Really, we mean it this time.”  As a boutique web design company that creates SEO-friendly web designs, we can report to you with absolute certainty that high quality content is king.  How do we know? We are on the front line of small biz SEO – we have dozens of SEO clients and have seen first-hand how client companies with both active blogs and social media networks handily outperformed their competitors in 2013.  If you are a small business owner and somehow still have high organic search engine rank without a content strategy, let me be the first to tell you that at some point in the near future you will be kissing your organic rank goodbye.

Here are five reasons why small business SEO strategy should focus on content marketing versus volume backlink accumulation:

1. The Fall of Boiler Room Link Building – Hip, Hip, Hooray!

Low cost, high volume offshore link building is not only dead, it’s super risky.  Google dropped the granddaddy of all backlink penalties on October 4th 2013 (Penguin 2.1 aka Penguin 5) – and guess what – more Penguin updates are coming.  If you are using an offshore link building strategy, you may soon find your website flagged with a Manual Action or an Unnatural Link Warning message in your Webmaster Tools account.  Don’t know what a WT account is?  Start Googling and get your account setup today – it’s the best way to check the search engine health of your website or to see if you’ve been hit with any penalties – and probably the best way to keep tabs on your SEO company.

2. Death, Taxes & Google 

Remember Ben Franklin’s famous quote? In this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes. On the Internet, pretty much everything you put out there is a part of permanent digital record.  This is especially true of your website’s backlink profile.   Even though your site may not yet have been slapped by Mother Google, your website still may be at risk.  Further, today’s white-hat SEO methods may become tomorrow’s prohibited activities – and Google always catches up with short-cut link building techniques.  By focusing on quality content and by creating your own content distribution channel, you can start naturally attracting quality links instead of artificially creating risky links.

3. Social Networking

We’ve been in and around web design and SEO for over ten years.  If you can believe it, we didn’t have a blog or any type of social media account until last year.  Why so late to the party? Because until last year, we could dominate our own online niches with a static website and passive SEO strategies.  Social media is now a critical component of SEO.  Just creating great content is not enough. The search engines need some way to determine if your content is valuable and the best measureable way for them to do this is to calculate the number of social signals (shares, likes, pluses, tweets, links, etc.) pointing back to your content.  So when our agency discusses “content marketing”, part of what we mean is promoting content through your active social media channels.

4. BLOGGING – NOTE THE ALL CAPS

In terms of small business websites, blogging represents both the biggest opportunity and the biggest challenge.  Blogging not only helps to establish your company as an authority, but it’s also proven to increase website traffic conversion rates. Most importantly, blogging is the best way to add high quality, relevant content to your website.  The search engines love high quality blog content.  Search engine ranking factors have changed dramatically over the years, however, most SEO industry experts agree that blogging is now critically important.  This is never going to change.  All small businesses that want to achieve and sustain maximum search engine visibility will have to maintain an active blog.  Ideally, company blog posts are written by the business owner or some other experienced employee. If your company does not have an active blog, you should consider making it a priority this year.

5. MORE BLOGGING

We said it: maintaining an active blog is essential. There is more you can do.  Guest blogging is a phenomenal way to get exclusive, relevant, high-quality content on your website.  What’s even better is that the guest author will typically market their guest blog post for you.  That’s right – they will go out and blast your website to their social networking channels and help market the content for you! Supplementing your own blog with a well-executed guest blogging program will get you both great content and coveted social signals…free of charge.

Guest blogging goes both ways.   You also want to target high quality, relevant websites and post on their sites.  Reciprocal guest blogging is a secret weapon for many SEO companies.

content-marketingA Word Of Caution 

Organic search engine rankings are more important than ever.  The ranking factors have shifted from being backlink-centric to being content-centric.  Companies have to be careful to avoid the same types of SEO short-cuts that got webmasters and business owners in trouble in the past.  The search engines are getting really good at filtering out copied and low quality content.  Spammy filler content from domestic and offshore content farms will hurt your rankings.  Google has declared war on all forms of webspam.  In fact, they just recently condemned content stitching and warned against misusing guest blog posts.    In other words, you should only publish unique blog content that is interesting or useful to your audience.  If you try to blog only for the sake of the search engines, chances are you will fail to get any SEO value.  For most businesses, great content is everywhere.  It’s just a matter of extracting stories and lessons from everyday business experience and having the discipline to document and publish them on a regular basis.

phil-singletonPhil Singleton is the owner of Kansas City Web Design®, a web development firm specializing in SEO-friendly WordPress websites and custom website applications, and Kansas City SEO®, a full-service Internet marketing services company that provides organic search engine optimization and other online marketing services.  Contact Phil on his Google+ page.

Hummingbird and Hashtags: Keeping Your Google Plus Content Strategy Alive

Thursday is guest post day here at Duct Tape Marketing and today’s guest is Lauren Hogan – Enjoy!

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Photo credit: misspixels

With Google’s recent Hummingbird update, anyone who does online marketing was forced to review & revamp their marketing strategy. The Hummingbird update specifically impacts the social media marketing realm by increasing SEO dependence on Google Plus hashtags. Whereas, previously, it was used to track post content now, using hashtags with your Google Plus posts helps optimize your content to display in search.

Here’s why this update matters: Google Plus is the second largest social platform with just over 50% of the global internet user market and boasts roughly 1,203 million users per month (visits to Gmail are counted). These are astounding numbers not to be overlooked. Do not exclude the use of hashtags if part of your content strategy includes Google Plus. Here are 5 ideas of how to use hashtags in your content strategy:

1)  Basic Use

This is simple. If you are posting content to your business Google Plus account, throw in a few hashtags to help support the reach of your post. Find a happy medium between the standard hashtag use on Twitter and Instagram. 2-4 hashtags per post is a realistic goal.

2)  Optimization

You have a blog. You have an SEO strategy. You have a Google Plus account. Now let’s connect the dots. It can never hurt to optimize your post for organic search & use those optimized words as hashtags.

3)  Photo Content

The most popular activity on Google Plus is photo sharing. Utilize hashtags when you post to provide equal opportunity for your post to be viewed.

4)  Networking

Communities are a great way to reach a targeted audience and invite an opportunity for more sharing, +1’s and discussion. When you post content to a community make sure to include hashtags to encourage and track conversation around the topic of choice.

5)  Conversation

Just as you would on Twitter, use hashtags that relate to your business and your goals. This includes choices such as #tech or #socialmedia. However, unlike Twitter you can use specific hashtags such as #techtips or #socialmediamarketing. You can even attach on to a couple hashtags that already spark weekly conversation. Examples include #MondayMotivation and #FridayFun.

headshot squareLauren Hogan is the Social Media Coordinator at HomeAdvisor which offers homeowners tools including Cost Guide, a resource to help budget your next home improvement project and DesignMine, a site to help collect, organize and bring to life home project ideas. She enjoys trail running in the summer and spending time on the slopes in the winter. Connect on Twitter

 

How to Maximize Email Lead Capture

Despite the reports coming out of some corners of social media, email as a marketing tool is very much alive. In fact, email marketing still produces the highest return on investment of any form of marketing.

Internet marketers have always known the money is in the list, but the real power of email marketing comes when you integrate it with content and social media. I’ve written about the idea of a total integrated online presence frequently so today I want to focus on one very important element of email marketing and that’s lead capture.

Lead capture is simply the idea of offering a reason for every web site visitor to join your email marketing list. Of course, this comes with the assumption that you’re creating and offering a compelling reason, usually the promise of a specific and future form of content, for someone to exchange their email address in return.

Once that threshold is crossed you need to also study and implement the best methods for maximizing your email lead capture.

Quite often this is simply a matter of putting the right call to action in the right place at the right time.

Since you can’t always know when someone will decide they’re ready to subscribe I like to first think in terms of creating many entry points – someone who, say, wouldn’t go looking to subscribe might get inspired after reading a particularly timely blog post found in search.

The following three forms of capture should be considered before you determine your precise set of tools.

Active capture – I like to go out looking for people who want my content so I create things like free ebooks and push specific landing pages for this form of content out via advertising and strategic partnerships. I actively build my list in this way.

Passive capture – I also want to make it easy for people who stumble upon my content to subscribe by placing subscribe forms in strategic locations throughout my site.

Shared capture – The final consideration is to look for ways that people can share your content, particularly if that act of sharing can lead to fresh exposure to your lead capture system. Don’t forget to promote sharing to your existing list as well.

Some new plugins that let people Pay With a Like or take a social action such as Like to Unlock make sharing even more viral.

Now let’s move to some of the proven ways to implement each of these types of capture.

Lightbox pop over – many people claim to hate the pop ups, and with good reason, but the fact is that smart pop ups – ones that only appear one time and only after people have read for a bit, convert.

Feature box at top of home page – Some WordPress themes come complete with a feature that allows you to keep your desire to have people subscribe right up there front and center on every page. This is a proven way to make sure people know this is an option.

  • Many form tools work for this, but Gravity Forms is particularly useful for WordPress

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End of each blog post – Often people will come to your site anew by way of a blog post found when conducting a search. This may be the only page on your site they visit that day so many smart marketers place the subscribe box at the end of every post with the idea that if someone really likes that one piece of content they may want to see what else there is.

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Right sidebar – I’ve always placed a rather generic sign up form in the right sidebar of my theme and month after month this position brings in subscribers.

Bar across top of page – It’s rather in vogue at the moment to place those attention grabbing thin bars across the top of pages that draw attention to sign up without completely distracting the view.

About us page – For many people the about us page is a high traffic page. People are doing research on your organization and this is a great place to first sell the fact that you’re all about great content and then make a pitch for people to sign up.

Contact us page – This is another little used place to find subscribers but I find that when someone wants to get in contact they often follow me on social media and subscribe all from this page.

Use your email service provider’s ability to track various forms so that you can monitor what placement is performing well. Tools like Gravity Forms offer A/B split testing so your can try different calls to action.

Finally, I’ll drop one more pretty big consideration on you. Statistics say that only about 1-3% of visitors to most sites actually take the plunge and subscribe.

So, what about the rest?

A new and growing field of web site software is attempting make sense of anonymous visitor tracking – people who don’t give your any data, but consume content.

Anonymous visits

The following software can help you turn random visits into leads by providing additional information such company name and allowing you to offer specific kinds of content and offers based on how they came to your site and what pages they visited. This knowledge can help you turn more of these visits into subscribes.

So you see, it’s not a matter of creating a form and hoping lots of people find it and take action. Lead capture takes a comprehensive and strategic approach, but it’s worth the effort.

5 New Realities of SEO

Back in the day, SEO was more technical and less, well, semantic. Now I realize that for most a term like semantic query relevancy might as well be the name of computer programming language, but the fact is Google’s customers, the searcher and the advertiser, are no longer content with results based on related page keyword content. This Wall Street Journal article explains Google’s take

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To improve accuracy Google and Bing both are attempting to understand what is actually meant by a search and refine results based on things like recency, location, context and of course relevance.

For example if you search “best place to buy a MacBook Pro” there was a time when search engines would return results of blog posts about good places to buy a MacBook Pro or maybe even computer reviews. From that you might have been able to find what you were looking for, but with semantic knowledge graph built in Google is more likely to think – oh, you want to buy a MacBook Pro and I know where you are and I know the inventory levels of the nearest stores with sale prices, so here are your results.

What this means for website owners is they can no longer count on writing content about a subject, optimizing it and going to work on links to the page. Sure, that stuff will always play a role, but there are other significant factors at play today.

Google officially rolled out a new search algorithm recently that employs a great deal of their progress in semantic search. The update is called “Hummingbird” and while traces of it have been coming in previous updates, this one is significant and lasting.

Search has been heading this way for some time now. So, no SEO is not dead once again, unless you mean quick SEO – SEO that doesn’t contain relationship and authority building. Bottom-line though – quality, frequency, depth and authority matter more than ever.

Below are five realities that site owners and SEO professionals must address in order to remain relevant.

Social signals matter a lot

One of the biggest factors baked into search results are signals that search engines can receive about content quality based on social interactions. How many +1s a page has matters greatly as do shares, likes and retweets. My guess is that it’s nearly impossible to get most content to rank without it.

In depth is the new snack sized

One of the things blogs ushered in was the ability to create small little bits of content frequently. While readers seem to enjoy this, often the content lacked much depth and certainly did not engender many retweets and shares (unless you are Seth Godin and you’re followed by 113,000 people on Google+ even though you’ve never shared anything on Google+)

Many people still throw out thinly disquised lists as link bait, but nothing gets shared and strongly indexed today like long, in depth narrowly cast articles. Google has even created markup standards for in depth articles as long as 2000-5000 words.

Who writes it matters too

Authority based on authorship has grown to be a major ranking factor. Claiming your own Google+ Authorship for your content is vital. This includes telling Google other places where your content appears.

While there is no “kloutlike” scoring system as of yet, understanding whose content is thought of authoritative because that’s your relationship building hit list!

Link building is networking

Past Google updates with names like Panda and Penguin were different than Hummingbird as they we updates to fix stuff, mostly artificial link building. Like it or not the more sophisticated algorithms become the harder it is to fake link relationships. Link building in the old school SEO fashion is going the way of the compact disc so you better get good at writing high quality content, sharing high quality content and building authoritative relationships with people that Google thinks matter when it comes to content.

In case that sounds like good old fashion networking that’s because it is.

Keyword not provided is the new deal

Site owners long ago made a deal with Google – let us crawl your site and we’ll tell you who is visiting your site and why – just kidding – take a look at your Google Analyitcs these days and see if your “keyword not provide” or what terms someone searched on that brought them to your site is hovering in the 100% range like mine is.

There are some clever ways to hack together this data (future post on that) and word on the street is Google may find a way to sell it back to you through some sort of premium analytics, but look for some 3rd party tools to fill this gap and get used to a world without the ease of knowing why someone came to your site. (I suppose this is actually a step back into the more technical SEO need.)

Tomorrow I’m going to give you a look into my top 5 recommended action steps for addressing the new realities of SEO today.

 

8 Essential Tips to Guide Your Web Design Project

Thursday is guest post day here at Duct Tape Marketing and today’s guest is Jay Baron – Enjoy!

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photo credit: bibliojojo

Too often, when small businesses are redesigning their websites, they lose focus. They get caught up trying to design something super flashy and cool, instead of something that’s going to help consumers.

Designers even encourage this routine, because it secures their unlimited all-you-can-design fun passes. With “make website pretty” as the agreed-upon primary goal, designers can focus on creating uber-creative sites without being bothered by annoying distractions like measurable outcomes and ROI.

The problem with pretty websites is that they don’t do much more than look pretty. They don’t work.

After participating in countless design projects for small businesses through Madtown, I know the difference between a pretty website and a functional one, and I know what likely happened in the design room to lead to each result.

Here are 8 important tips to tuck away for the day you launch your next website redesign project. If you remember and actually follow these guidelines, it’ll help ensure that your next website is rooted in usability and business strategy, rather than ambiguous creativity.

1. Trust is the currency of success

Trust is the backbone of any design project. Accomplishing big things takes a lot of trust between designer and client. If you don’t trust your designer enough to let him run the show, you need to find another designer.

2. Content is design, too

The way you tell your story, describe your product or service, and present your tone and mood are just as important as the visual aspects of your website. People want to know what you’re offering and what makes you unique, which is something design can’t do on its own.

Remember: people visit websites to learn things and to figure out how to solve their problems, not to marvel at cool designs.

3. Designs always go out of style

Don’t worry about website design trends. They’re constantly changing, and they’ll do nothing but ensure that your website will look outdated in a few years. (“Look at this guy, still doing the minimalist thing!”)

Focus on providing real value and connecting people to the solutions to their problems, and let the rest fall into place naturally.

4. You’re not just designing, you’re solving problems

You will never have all the answers for your small business. Which means it’s never time to stop listening to new ideas, even–or especially–if they come from your website designer.

Design projects start with business problems, so your designer is going to be very familiar with what’s not working at your company. Really great designers have an inherent ability to not only identify those deficiencies, but to help you find solutions for them.

5. It’s a marathon, not a sprint

Websites are rarely successful the day they’re launched. After a website goes live, dozens of unchecked tasks remain on the To Do list: thing like AdWords, social media, analytics, heat maps, SEO, testing, and updates. These and countless other changes and problems will continue to present themselves for eternity, regardless of how strong your initial design was

What might work today could become ineffective 3 months from now. That doesn’t mean the idea was wrong in the first place–just that it’s no longer right.

6. Simplicity is power

Always keep a laser focus on what really matters for your business. If your main goal is to generate leads, don’t lose focus by adding other features that don’t help accomplish this.

7. Fear is healthy

It’s easy to get comfortable and complacent when all you care about is putting something on the internet that’s fun to look at. But if launching your new website doesn’t scare you even a little, you’re probably too focused on the design rather than the outcomes.

Fear also comes from taking risks. You can keep updating your website every few years, or you can try to do something unique and, by extension, scary.

8. The journey is part of the fun

There is no such thing as an overnight success. Starting a business takes years of hard work, lots of mistakes, and a smattering of small victories. You better be in it not only to summit the mountain, but to appreciate the climb.

Business owners often think that if they can just get a killer website that generates a bunch of leads, their business will change. And when that doesn’t happen, they’re quick to blame their designer, who did nothing but give the business owner exactly what he asked for: a cool website.

jay-baronJay Baron is a brand strategist at Madtown and Mighty Zombie.  You can follow him on Google+ and Twitter.

8 Alternatives to Google Keyword Tool

Keyword research is vital. It’s an essential tactic for developing a powerful content strategy, targeting pay per click advertising campaigns and improving search engine optimization.

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photo credit: shawncalhoun via photopin cc

For many years Google offered what was undoubtedly the most used free tool for conducting research on popular and not so popular keyword phrases with useful information regarding popularity, competition and suggested variations of phrases.

The tool was actually an AdWords offering that effectively helped people do better AdWords planning, but it certainly worked for all manner of research.

Recently Google decided to more tightly integrate the tool with AdWords and rebranded it as AdWords Planner. In addition to requiring users to log in to an AdWords account to access the tool a great deal of useful research functionality has been stripped away.

While I found that it was sufficient for most basic research it no longer serves that need very well.

Below are four free alternatives and four paid alternatives that I suggest business owners and marketers consider adding to their resource and research routines.

Free keyword tools

My favorite paid options

Assessing the Profitability of Top, Middle and Bottom of the Funnel Content

Thursday is guest post day here at Duct Tape Marketing and today’s guest is John-Henry Scherck – Enjoy!

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Image Credit: M Glasglow

Create engaging content! That’s what we tell every client. In the past few years, SEOs have fallen in love with top of the funnel content because it can help generate natural links and is less competitive/easier to rank for – but few SEOs analyze how profitable (or unprofitable) the content they recommend is for one of their clients.

A few weeks ago I met with my client, BodyLogicMD. It was a great meeting, we talked about how their brand is positioned against competitors, where the brand is going, current and future SEO initiatives… and then we started discussing next year’s content calendar.

It was at this point in the conversation that my client raised a very interesting point My agency advised our client to create a lot of content. There’s a page for each and every symptom, diet recommendation, and general questions patients may have (here’s an example).

BodyLogicMD was concerned that although this content might have pulled users into their lead funnel, they were driving low quality leads that didn’t convert to sales and tied up their call center’s time.

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Image Credit: ginnerobot

Basically, the leads were weak.

I’ve been agency-side my whole career. When I look at Google Analytics in the morning and I see a year-over-year increase in conversions, I think my team and I are doing our jobs. However, if I’m not looking at my client’s close rate for all the leads that are being generated due to our efforts – I have no idea if the work I am doing is actually growing their business.

That’s why it is essential to check in with your clients about lead quality.

I asked BodyLogicMD’s in house search marketing team for a huge data-dump:

1) Close rates for just the landing pages that had form fields.

2) Cost of converting a lead to a close

3) Average time a call that doesn’t result in a sale takes. T

4) Average pay of a call center employee.

5) Average value of a new patient.

We then categorized all of their content into three categories:

bio hormone therapy1) Bottom of the Funnel – These pages drive high converting organic visits. These pages mainly consist of physician bio pages (example) and geographic pages (example). This content is all geo-targeted, conversion focused and is sometimes served to search engine users in nearby areas when search for head terms.

2) Middle of the Funnel – This type of content fulfills information search queries. The content is not nearly as conversion oriented as the bottom of the funnel content. The users who land on these pages via a search engine are usually coming in via head terms.

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Image Credit: photofarmer

3) Top of the Funnel – These are the pages that we, as SEOs, beg our clients to create. They are tangentially related to BodyLogicMD’s business and are mainly educational pages with the goal of pushing a user to convert through a very long funnel.

We analyzed the profit and loss of each of these three categories to make sure that:

1) Top of the funnel content was profitable

2) Figure out just how profitable each type of content is for BodyLogicMD.

Here are the results for leads that converted on a form field of a landing page:

Top of the Funnel Content

9.8% of leads, 6.7% of new business with a 6.7% close rate

Middle of the Funnel Content

73.1% of new leads and 56.6% of new business with a 4.8% close rate

Bottom of the Funnel

17% of leads and 36.6% of new business with a 16.3% close rate.

Using the information that the client provided us with and some basic math, we were able to figure out that every bottom of the funnel lead is worth twice as much as a top of the funnel lead and almost three times as much as a middle of the funnel lead.

With this information in hand, we’ve augmented our strategy to make the bottom of the funnel pages our #1 ranking priority. We know these pages are highly effective at converting prospects into sales, so we are going to focus a large chunk of our efforts here.

Although it would be great to just focus on bottom of the funnel terms, we know there isn’t nearly as much search volume for geo-modified bioidentical terms, so we are still going to pay attention to the middle of the funnel as well, but now that we know where the real money is being generated – we are going after those keywords with full force.

A large chunk of BodyLogicMD’s visits come through top of the funnel, but few of their sales do. This content still drives leads, so we aren’t going to kill off top of the funnel content. However, we are no longer going to do any intentional link building to top of the funnel pages because we know they are not nearly as valuable as middle or bottom of the funnel pages.

In order to compete on a local level, we have decided to charge up our marketing strategy to focus on community events and event marketing, local citations that provide links, and getting doctors who are not as prominent in the press. In the past we focused on BodyLogicMD as a whole, but with this new data in hand, we are going with a more granular process that will allow for success on a local level.

Analyzing the effectiveness and profitability of your content is a must for every SEO, especially when it comes to focusing raising rankings for certain pages, because if you don’t know how profitable that type of content is, you have no idea how it will impact a business.

JHTScherck PicJohn-Henry Scherck is an SEO Consultant at SEER Interactive. When he’s not building links or assessing the profitability of client content, he can be found cooking up a storm in the kitchen, abusing and over-using his Netflix subscription and blogging about scalable marketing strategies on his blog, TLCSEO.com.