Let's Stop Being So Rude

jonycunha via Flickr

I have to admit this post is in response to something that happened last night and I’ll try not to rant too much.

In an effort to help a confused individual that requested our help via email (understand this was not a customer, just a weary traveler) we asked a couple clarifying questions to try to understand how we could help. What we received back was an insult filled rant about how we should apologize for not knowing what she wanted. Geez!

I’ve long since lost the temptation to respond to these kinds of oddities, but it did make me think how this real-time, I want it now, and I want it now free online culture we’ve developed is eroding basic manners.

To put a spotlight back on the art of appreciation for the gifts we all give and receive I’m going to run a little giveaway with the help of American Express Recognize and Reward Sweepstakes at (AMEX OPEN is a client)

I’m going to giveaway five $50 American Express Gift Cards to five people that leave the best comment to this challenge:

What’s the most over the top “thank you” you’ve ever received from a boss, employee, colleague, customer, supplier, friend, you name it.

And please, let’s recapture our basic manners and stop being so hard on one another.

Administrative Professionals Day is April 27th and Supervisors, bosses and business-professionals can also express gratitude by nominating a standout administrative professional, colleague or peer from their LinkedIn Network into the American Express Recognize and Reward Sweepstakes at

How to Deliver an Experience

For a lot of businesses, taking the order is where marketing ends. For smart marketers, it’s the starting point for the next order and the referral. If you stop your marketing thinking at the transaction, you’ll find it harder and harder to build real marketing momentum.

How you conduct the transaction is marketing, how you deliver or present the product or service is marketing, how you continue to educate and make additional offers is marketing, and how you stay in touch to measure results is marketing.

I’ve done some work with eBay and Etsy sellers and those businesses are great examples of how a company can either struggle or thrive based on how well they see purchases as customers rather than transactions.

The series of photos below represent what I believe is a great example of how to deliver an experience with your product. I’ll add my thoughts to the process of steps that make this a nice case study. This comes from Etsy seller Katie Blair Designs.

Plain padded envelope, but with special hand drawn doodles - this isn't an Amazon package - it's just what I would expect from my hand made purchase

The full contents of the package - wow, very nice looking presentation and look, a business card. Not that innovative, but strangely rare.

And what's this? A free sample of another product - now I want to buy some of those note cards

On the back of the business card Katie has hand written a special offer for my next purchase - I'm feeling pretty good about this and I haven't even opened the actual product

On to the purchase - I bought this for myself, but it's like getting a gift. Note the added branding with the sticker.

The product revealed and note the subtle band of branding on the actual product - how will I ever forget Katie Blair Designs now.

The actual product, found online, is what attracted me, but it was the overall experience that has me referring this business and wanting to buy more because I have a lot of, hmm, brilliant ideas

Weekend Favs April Twenty Three

My weekend blog post routine includes posting links to a handful of tools or great content I ran across during the week. I don't go into depth about the finds, but encourage you check them out if they sound interesting.…

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