The Art of the Start 2.0

Art-Of-Start-2-674x1024Marketing Podcast with Guy Kawasaki

Officially a startup is any business just getting started but over the last few years the term startup has come to mean a certain kind of business just getting started or perhaps even a certain mindset no matter how old the business is.

Personally I lean towards the latter. Startup is more of a mindset than a timeframe and that can be a good thing and a bad thing.

Many startup businesses never graduate to become real businesses because what it took to start is not what it took to grow and mature.

For some the chaos of “everyone does everything” is intoxicating. For others the inability of the founder to surround themselves with people that support the gaps they might have in marketing, operations, finance and even leadership either leads to certain death of a kind of stagnant purgatory of just enough revenue to pay the bills. (Otherwise known as a job.)

My guest for this week’s episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast is Guy Kawasaki, Chief Evangelist of Canva and author of the new book The Art of the Start 2.0, The Time-Tested, Battle-Hardened Guide for Anyone Starting Anything

In a testament to either my advancing age or strident consistency, I had Guy on this show over a decade ago when Art of the Start 1.0 came out.

Much has changed in the last 10 years and much has remained the same. In a note that struck me personally Guy claims that the hardest part of starting a business is learning how to lead and inspire others and I certainly concur.

By nature the very strengths the serve them getting started – things like tenacity, ingenuity and constant innovation (sometimes manifest as the idea of the week) are the things that sink them when they need to let go.

Guy is always a fun interview and The Art of the Start 2.0 is a must read of any – yes any – business owners or wannabe business owner.

Questions I ask Guy:

  • What is a Startup?
  • How do you make a pitch to potential investors?
  • How do you effectively build a team?

What You’ll Learn If You Give A Listen:

  • Why to hire people with complimentary skills to yours
  • How to raise funds for your startup using traditional and new methods
  • What venture capitalists and evangelists look for in a potential investment

Does Every Consultant Need To Write a Book

Marketing podcast with Guy Kawasaki

Consultant Books

photo credit: Patrick Gage via photopin cc

I asked the question contained in the title of this post in a community I moderate on Google+ (Consultant Exchange– join us if you are a coach or consultant)

Somewhat predictably answers fell into two camps – those with a book said yes it was very helpful and meaningful to their business. Those without a book said no they didn’t think it was necessary and that a well written blog might be more important.

In my business having a book (and now three) made a significant difference in terms of creating more speaking, branding and consulting opportunities. Now, a key measure in the equation is that these books are well regarded and sold well enough to stand on their own – but there’s no question my books have led to a bigger brand for Duct Tape Marketing.

I posed the same question to my friend Guy Kawasaki and his take was a little more reserved – “Writing a book to open other opportunities is the wrong reason to write a book. You should write a book because you have something to say or are passionate about promoting a cause or idea.”

Kawasaki has written twelve books, including the just released APE: Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur – How to Publish a Book. Kawasaki wrote the book to reveal everything he’s learned along the way as an author and entrepreneur with the added lessons gained from publishing his last two books without the aid of the traditional publishing machine.

APE is meant to introduce the concept of “artisinal publishing” as a powerful avenue for anyone wishing to get their message heard in the form of a book much like an artist practicing and promoting their craft might do.

As someone that’s written several books I can tell you that if you have a desire to write a book, but have no desire to publish on your own, the section on writing a book is worth the money. If you do plan to write and publish your own work the guidance on the very specific elements of editing, formatting and submitting digital books is a gold mine.

I do believe that we have come to a point where honing and communicating a specific point of view is an essential practice in the worlds of coaching, consulting and marketing and a book is one format to do so.

More importantly perhaps is that you practice your craft in a way that allows you to gain the experience and insight needed to construct a point of view worth sharing – do that and you’re on your way to writing that book.

And Now The Enchanting Mr Kawasaki

Marketing podcast with Guy Kawasaki (Click to play or right click and "Save As" to download - Subscribe now via iTunes or subscribe via other RSS device (Google Listen) Guy Kawasaki is launching his tenth book today - “Enchantment –…

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