Duct Tape Selling Launches This Week

When my first book, Duct Tape Marketing, finally went on sale I told my readers that it felt like I’d given birth. A number of women were quick to point out that I knew not of which I spoke. I’ve been careful ever since not to make the same mistake, but certainly somewhere in nature there is an appropriate metaphor to describe a book launch. (Please feel free to suggest one.)

Just fair warning – To celebrate the occasion of the launch of Duct Tape Selling I’ll probably be extra promotional this week so hopefully you’ll allow.

Below is a very short book trailer produced by the talented folks at Simplifilm. I hope you like it and I hope you’ll share its message with others.

You can also find lots of other great information about the book and some fun stuff to share by heading over to my Duct Tape Selling Social Objects page.

In addition, I want to share the best of this week’s guest blog posts from the Duct Tape Selling Blog.

3 Simple Elements To Test To Perfect Your Twitter Messaging

When it comes to social media marketing, you can spend all your time studying up on the best methods and practices and still not feel totally confident.

Are you posting at the right times? With the right content? Could your message be connecting better

Enter testing. Read the rest . . . from the good folks at Buffer

Tips On Setting Up Your One Question Testimonial Machine

When setting up your one question testimonial, it’s easy to focus on the customers who would refer your product or service to friends and ignore the ones who wouldn’t. But this would be a big mistake. The customers who wouldn’t refer you to a friend are a great source of information to help you find out what went wrong and what you could do better. Read the rest . . . from the good folks at Wufoo

Get on the Infographics Movement

Infographics are increasingly being included in a marketers’ arsenal. Deceptively, they look like something made for pre-schoolers with its bright clip art and playful copy. Even so, infographics are increasingly being used in boardrooms, notice boards, blogs and social media. Here’s why you need to get on it too. Read the rest . . . from the good folks at Piktochart

Two Secrets to How Small Businesses Can Win More Sales

Selling at a small business isn’t easy. The bigger companies have brands that help them open new doors and win competitive sales. They have strong marketing support. And often they have deep pockets and aren’t afraid to use them. Read the rest . . . from the good folks at RainToday

Building a Consistent Blog Readership

Many bloggers dream of writing that epic blog post. One that drives so much traffic, links and shares that the front page of Reddit is a foregone conclusion.

blog readers

photo credit: Ed Yourdon via photopin cc

Common wisdom suggests that to write anything even kind of like that you must plan and toil and slave over the writing until you’ve packed so much in there people must flock to it.

Well, the reality is most people don’t need to blog to create uber-popular blog posts or become popular bloggers.

The utility in blogging for the majority of businesses is the eventual creation of a body of work that covers the chapters or keyword themes that attract readers, prospects and customers.

In that regard, consistency, usefulness, value, education and sturdiness all trump epic.

I recently revealed what I call a Total Content System that addresses a “themed” approach to mapping out monthly content, but today I want to talk about another element that can help establish a daily and weekly rhythm for your blogging.

One of the ways to develop a loyal following is a consistent pattern of content features that can help your readers know what to expect when they subscribe, share and look for your new posts.

An easy way to do this is to break your week down into standard features. You can go as far as describing or even naming your features or you can just use this idea as a loose framework for yourself.

Here’s an example of how I do this:

  • Monday – Usually reserved for something bigger picture, theme related post – usually something that people need to digest and adapt to use.
  • Tuesday – This is when I do my “5 Ways to Do X kind of post” or “How to use X kind of tool” – lots of links and teaching and usually pretty prescriptive. I publish an email newsletters on Wednesdays and I often use one of these first two posts as my featured article.
  • Wednesday – This is podcast day. I publish a new episode and write some commentary related to the subject.
  • Thursday – This is guest post day. I run a post written by someone I’ve invited to add a new perspective to the monthly theme
  • Friday – I usually do something on the lighter side or at least not straight up marketing
  • Saturday – I run a feature I call Weekend Favs. It’s just a quick highlight of three new tools I’ve discovered during the week. Funny, but I sometimes get more feedback on this than anything else I do
  • Sunday – No post on this day, but truth be known I often work on Monday and Tuesday’s posts

One of my readers shared a routine he is planning for new site recently and I think it helps shed some light on how flexible this approach is.

Here’s how Bruno Coelho plans to break his daily posts down.

  • A question worth answering
  • An action worth doing
  • A lesson worth learning
  • An Online Dreampreneur worth following
  • A week worth remembering

This aspect of a Total Content System further allows you to plan and build your content knowing that you need four lessons, questions, interviews, etc., each month.

But, perhaps the most important aspect is that it also allows your readers to get a feel for what to expect day in and day out.

Ask your readers or customers what they want, use tools like Survey Monkey, Wufoo or Qualaroo to gain insights into what people are looking for and then experiment until you get the mixture that feels right.